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marriage_in_welfare_reform [2015/10/25 09:01]
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marriage_in_welfare_reform [2015/11/16 07:28] (current)
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 =====1. Importance of Marriage===== =====1. Importance of Marriage=====
    
-The importance of [[effects_of_marriage_on_society|marriage]] and the [[effects_of_family_structure_on_government_dependency|intact,​ two-parent family]] to the success of welfare reform cannot be overestimated. The family is the building block of society. As America'​s founders---particularly John Adams and John Witherspoon---put it, marriage is the bulwark of the social order and the "​seedbed of virtue"​ upon which the Republic rests.((Nancy F. Cott, //Public Vows: A History of Marriage and Nation// (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000), ​pp. 19-21.)) It is the organism through which the very life of a nation is nurtured and passed on to future generations.+The importance of [[effects_of_marriage_on_society|marriage]] and the [[effects_of_family_structure_on_government_dependency|intact,​ two-parent family]] to the success of welfare reform cannot be overestimated. The family is the building block of society. As America'​s founders---particularly John Adams and John Witherspoon---put it, marriage is the bulwark of the social order and the "​seedbed of virtue"​ upon which the Republic rests.((Nancy F. Cott, //Public Vows: A History of Marriage and Nation// (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2000), 19-21.)) It is the organism through which the very life of a nation is nurtured and passed on to future generations.
  
-As social science research and government surveys document, the retreat from marriage in America since the 1960s has been accompanied by a rise in a number of serious social problems. Compared to children in two-parent intact families, children who are [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_poverty|born out of wedlock]] or whose parents'​ [[effects.of.divorce.on.financial.stability|divorce]] are much more likely to experience poverty, [[effects_of_family_structure_on_child_abuse|abuse]],​ and [[effects.of.divorce.on.children.s.behavior|behavioral and emotional problems]], to have lower [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|academic achievement]],​ and to [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_health|use drugs]] more often. Compared to married mothers, single mothers are much more likely to be victims of domestic violence.((U.S. Department of Justice, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1999.)) On the other hand, when parents marry or remain married, the benefits to their children are substantial. Adolescents from such families have been found to have [[effects_of_marriage_on_physical_health|better health and fewer developmental problems]], are less likely to[[effects.of.marriage.on.children.s.education| repeat a grade in school]] or be [[effects.of.marriage.on.mental.health|depressed]],​((See Linda J. Waite and Maggie Gallagher, //The Case for Marriage: Why Married People Are Happier, Healthier, and Better Off Financially//​ (New York: Doubleday, 2000), ​pp. 124-140.)) and tend to achieve significantly [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|higher grades]] than children raised in alternative family structures.((Mellissa Gordon and Ming Cui, “School-Related Parental Involvement and Adolescent Academic Achievement:​ The Role of Community Poverty,” //Family Relations// ​Vol. 63 Issue 10 (2010) 154-163.+As social science research and government surveys document, the retreat from marriage in America since the 1960s has been accompanied by a rise in a number of serious social problems. Compared to children in two-parent intact families, children who are [[effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_poverty|born out of wedlock]] or whose parents'​ [[effects.of.divorce.on.financial.stability|divorce]] are much more likely to experience poverty, [[effects_of_family_structure_on_child_abuse|abuse]],​ and [[effects.of.divorce.on.children.s.behavior|behavioral and emotional problems]], to have lower [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_education|academic achievement]],​ and to [[effects_of_divorce_on_children_s_health|use drugs]] more often. Compared to married mothers, single mothers are much more likely to be victims of domestic violence.((U.S. Department of Justice, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1999.)) On the other hand, when parents marry or remain married, the benefits to their children are substantial. Adolescents from such families have been found to have [[effects_of_marriage_on_physical_health|better health and fewer developmental problems]], are less likely to[[effects.of.marriage.on.children.s.education| repeat a grade in school]] or be [[effects.of.marriage.on.mental.health|depressed]],​((See Linda J. Waite and Maggie Gallagher, //The Case for Marriage: Why Married People Are Happier, Healthier, and Better Off Financially//​ (New York: Doubleday, 2000), 124-140.)) and tend to achieve significantly [[effects_of_family_structure_on_children_s_education|higher grades]] than children raised in alternative family structures.((Mellissa Gordon and Ming Cui, “School-Related Parental Involvement and Adolescent Academic Achievement:​ The Role of Community Poverty,” //Family Relations// 63, no. 10 (2010)154-163.
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