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effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_poverty [2015/10/22 21:28]
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effects_of_out-of-wedlock_births_on_poverty [2015/10/22 21:30] (current)
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-==========Effects of Out-of-Wedlock Births on Poverty==========+=========Effects of Out-of-Wedlock Births on Poverty==========
  
 =====1. Unmarried Parents===== =====1. Unmarried Parents=====
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 Since very few single mothers who were employed full-time/​full-year would remain poor, marriage has little effect in reducing poverty in this scenario. Nearly 96 percent of married couples would have incomes above the poverty level, compared to 90 percent of single mothers. However, marriage would raise the family incomes of many full-time working mothers well above poverty and into middle-class levels. Since very few single mothers who were employed full-time/​full-year would remain poor, marriage has little effect in reducing poverty in this scenario. Nearly 96 percent of married couples would have incomes above the poverty level, compared to 90 percent of single mothers. However, marriage would raise the family incomes of many full-time working mothers well above poverty and into middle-class levels.
  
-Full-time working mothers would have a median income of around $17,500 per year. If these mothers married their child’s father, median family income would rise to $29,000 per year. As Chart 4 shows, nearly ​two-thirds of these married couples would have incomes above 150 percent of the poverty level. By contrast, only 20 percent of full-time working single mothers would have incomes above that level.+Full-time working mothers would have a median income of around $17,500 per year. If these mothers married their child’s father, median family income would rise to $29,000 per year. Nearly ​two-thirds of these married couples would have incomes above 150 percent of the poverty level. By contrast, only 20 percent of full-time working single mothers would have incomes above that level.